• Stories of Impact

Hunger Prevention

  • Manny's Story

    "Sometimes I run out of money to buy food," Manny tells me. He walks to our Casino Road Food Pantry every Tuesday from his apartment nearby. He loves the baked beans, and uses the pasta and ground beef to make spaghetti for his mom. Manuel moved up from Oregon over a year ago, and tries to help out with rent and bills. He works doing construction clean-up all over: Kirkland, Bellevue, Redmond, Shoreline, Edmonds. But things are really slow now, and he hasn't worked in several weeks. VOA opened our Casino Road Food Pantry in South Everett as a response to the COVID-19 crisis. As the need grew each week, so did the generosity of our community. This gave us inspiration every day, and gives Manny and his mom a spaghetti dinner every week.

  • Alex's Story

    Alex remembers the explosions, the deafening noise, the chaos. He’s looking at me, but he’s back on that street in the Ukraine, watching the funeral procession, the street packed with mourners. Then, shells from the Russian military into the crowd, blasts of fury and blinding light. Smoke everywhere and the smell of burned metal. Lives lost or scarred, forever. Alex remembers, because that’s when he and Hanna decided they needed to move to America. He came first, and she stayed behind with their two daughters. Hanna joined him a year and a half ago, and now they have three girls: five, four, and six months old. Alex worked construction for a while, before the knee and back injuries. It got so bad, he couldn't pick up his daughters without searing pain in his back. L&I payments help, and the $289 in food stamps they get each month, which they stretch at Costco. But, it’s not enough. “Imagine you have three kids and not enough money to pay your rent. We can’t buy clothes. We can’t get the things we need.” VOA’s Casino Road Food Pantry fills in the gaps each week, keeps food on the table for Alex, Hanna and the girls. They are looking for a fresh start, and we are helping give it to them.

  • Carsolyn's Story

    Carsolyn moved up to Washington from L.A. about five years ago to be closer to her daughter and grandkids. Today, she lives in South Everett, loves her church, and serves as the full-time caregiver for her brother. Carsolyn visited our Casino Road Food Pantry in South Everett and shared that the food "...is going to help me tremendously."

Preventing Homelessness & Lending A Hand

  • O's Story

    O doesn't want to answer my questions. She's three, and she'd much rather run around barefoot and show me that she can balance on one foot. Two months ago, O left her home state with her mom and seven year old brother, escaping domestic violence. They first stayed with Auntie, then a friend, then different couches. They were running out of options. Then, they found Maud's House, our shelter for women and children. For the last two and a half weeks, O's mom has found stability, support, and safety. She can sleep again. And, she sees a future in Snohomish County: a job for her, schools for her kids, a long-term apartment or home they can call their own. Somewhere safe. Somewhere that O can run around barefoot.

  • Andrew's Story

    Raden is three and Zoey is one. They're too young to remember when their dad blew out his back lifting cast iron pipes up three flights of stairs. Too young to understand that their family survived for a couple years on L&I payments and Tanya's income as a Dental Assistant. Too young to know that the L&I money stopped over a year ago, that Tonya's dental office closed due to Covid-19, and money stopped coming in. Andrew and Tanya didn't know where to turn. They called VOA's Sky Valley Resource Center and spoke with Dawnelle. She helped with rental assistance, so Andrew and Tanya don't have to worry about eviction. Raden and Zoey won't remember this. But Andrew won't forget that VOA was there when his family needed help.


  • Jim's Story

    Home of 40 years, gone. New car, lost. Paperwork, tools, belongings, everything, taken away. “I walked down my driveway with nothing.” Jim has had a breathtakingly awful past six months, yet his blue eyes still sparkle when he talks. He became homeless last October as a result of his 20-year struggle with opioid addiction. It’s a story that began with a devastating fall and his doctor overprescribing pain medication. “I found out most terminal cancer patients don’t take as much as they put me on,” he recalls. Since autumn, Jim has been hospitalized four times from illness, with stints as long as 15 days. After a stay in an in-patient rehab in Tukwila, he’s slept on couches, in trailers, in an open-air hangar, and now, in a motel for the month. At the mention of the motel, he turns and smiles at Peggy Ray, Director of VOAWW’s Arlington Community Resource Center (ACRC). The ACRC staff have been working to keep Jim fed and clothed and get him housed, while he has put in the work to stay sober. They paid for a motel while his housing navigator works on a long-term housing solution. “They took the fear of desperation away.” Jim’s eyes are glinting again. In a half-year, he lost everything and gained a new community on the other side. And that support isn’t going anywhere.

Volunteers and Staff

  • Dave's Story

    Peggy and her team at the ACRC knew about Dave, because they’d taken the time to listen. They heard about the father with a hair-trigger -- about how, as a child, Dave flew under the radar to avoid the belt. They heard about his first stint being homeless from 2013-2015, the drug dealers, the meth. They heard about the sequence of jobs he never kept for long, and about his second period of homelessness, from the summer of 2018 to last fall. That’s when Dave called 211 and VOA specialists referred him to the ACRC. That’s when everything changed. That’s when Dave found free meals and clothes; help with housing, utilities, and legal issues; and a community of people who don’t just talk at him. They talk to him. They listen. Today Dave is an official ACRC Intern, funded by WorkSource, with a daily schedule, responsibilities, and structure. His goal is to become a part-time Peer Support Specialist working with people experiencing homelessness. When he talks about his dog Max, he could be talking about the ACRC: “That’s unconditional love sitting right there. I try to mimic that dog when I do things now. I do my best to treat people like I want to be treated.” Today, Chief Ventura appreciates the work that Dave has put in and the support he’s received from the ACRC. “It’s been an amazing transformation,” says the Chief.

  • Dawnelle's Story

    Dawnelle loved growing up in Sultan. Her family has deep roots there and everyone is either a cousin or a friend. “Three-fourths of the town are relatives," she states with a grin. It was the classic small-town ideal, safe and familiar, nestled in picturesque Sky Valley. Then her parents divorced, and she moved away from that bubble of closeness. The next thirty years of life saw Dawnelle move to Alaska, and then to Arizona with her three kids. Life continued, though she never forgot her roots. And then Richard called. Richard, the boy from Sultan whom she had had a crush on since the 2nd grade. The time was right. She moved back to Sky Valley, to Richard, to home. But something had changed. Many had fallen on hard times. Her own childhood babysitter, *Lina, was homeless. Folks in her tight-knit hometown were sleeping under bridges. Begging for food. Asking for basic needs like shampoo and rain boots and deodorant. Dawnelle knew she had to do something. And do something she did. Now, if you find yourself in need in Sky Valley, you will probably speak with Dawnelle. She is the Campus Resource Manager at VOAWW’s Sky Valley Integrated Service Center, and she finds no greater joy than in helping her neighbors, including Lina. From rental assistance and food to soap and sanitary pads, Dawnelle is ready to help the most vulnerable people get what they need. “This community is my family,” she says. “And I want them to know we are here to help.” *Name changed to protect privacy.

  • Nels' Story

    If you visit our Everett Food Bank, there's a good chance you'll talk to Nels."I ask them if they want meat, dairy, or dog or cat food. I love helping other people." Nels first came to our Food Bank as a recipient. A heart attack sidelined him in 1998, and he's had two strokes since then. "They won't let me work, so I volunteer." For the past three years, Nels has volunteered four days a week. He knows how important our Food Bank is, because of those times when he was on the other side of the table. Thanks Nels! We appreciate you.

Videos

  • Jesse's Story

    Born with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, Jesse has struggled with anger and self-control. Brian from VOA has helped Jesse manage his anger and live independently.

  • Natalie's Story

    Natalie's mom Erin appreciate's VOA's Meaningful Day Program, which gives Natalie a supportive community, new friends, and fun activities. And, it gives Erin a much-needed break from her full-time role as a care giver.

  • Chocolate

    Staff member Eric recounts his quest to find the right chocolate for one of his clients, who is blind, deaf and autistic, and communicates through sign language. 

Community Support

  • Judy

    "When I realized that I would be soon receiving $1,200 in COVID-19 relief funds, I didn’t immediately think of purchasing something for myself that I might want but not need. I am a retired teacher, and I will continue to receive a pension and social security payments every month. I immediately thought of donating this $1,200 to be of use in my community. That led me to the VOA Food Pantry on Casino Road and Faith Food Bank near Madison Street. I live between those two streets. I am sending my $1,200 to those two organizations that are helping others not as fortunate as myself during this pandemic."

  • Miles & Gemma

    "I wanted to get some money for my piggy bank so people can have a lot of food and so they can buy stuff and they can be happy." When 4-year-old Miles overheard his mom talking on the phone about her donation to the Casino Road Food Pantry, he decided to act. He enlisted his older sister Gemma, and together they did extra chores to put money in their piggy bank. Yesterday, with delivery service provided by their mom, they delivered $29.00 to our Casino Road Food Pantry. Thanks Miles and Gemma! You are making a difference in the world.

  • Adam

    Kudos to local John L. Scott realtor Adam Braddock who's working to ensure no one goes hungry. In the Spring of 2020, Adam offered to use his billboard to promote our Hunger Prevention work. He paid for all printing costs and managed the installation himself. In May and June of 2020, drivers could see his act of generosity if they're headed southbound on the Mukilteo Speedway, near the intersection with Beverly Park Road. Thank you Adam!

Have a VOA story to share? Contact Marketing & Communications Specialist Traci Baird:
Phone: (425) 609-2220
tbaird@voaww.org